Ken Arnold

Ken Arnold

  • Ken Arnold, PhD, Head of Public Programmes at Wellcome Trust and Visiting Professor at Medical Museion
  • www.wellcomecollection.org
  • Ken Arnold is Head of Public Programmes at Wellcome Trust and the world’s leading authority on the interface between history of medicine, medical museums and sci-art. His major achievement is the Wellcome Trust’s world-famous public venue, Wellcome Collection, a public venue opened in 2007 that seeks to explore the connections between medicine, art and life. Wellcome Collection embodies much of Ken Arnold’s vision for a culturally inspired public engagement with medicine and wellbeing, and has been nominated for the Museum of the Year and European Museum of the Year awards. The establishment of the Wellcome Collection and the other aspects of Ken Arnold’s exhibition practice and engagement in sci-art are to a large extent based on his academic research into the cross-disciplinary junction between history of medicine and museology. By bringing academic history of medicine, biomedical scientists and art practitioners together in a new form of ‘hybrid space’ that addresses an adult, educated audience, Dr. Arnold has set new agendas for science, technology and medical (STM) museums.
Adam Bencard

Adam Bencard

  • Adam Bencard, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Medical Museion and The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research
  • http://www.museion.ku.dk/about-museion/staff/adam-bencard/
  • I am assistant professor in science communication at the The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research and at the Medical Museion in Copenhagen. My work is split evenly between practical science communication (mainly curating exhibitions, most recently the exhibition Balance and Metabolism at the Medical Museion) and theoretical research. My research interest is focused on issues surrounding presence, embodiment, aesthetics and what it means to be human in a post-genomic world. My current research project explores microbiome studies and new genetic discourses, searching for how concepts of what life is are being (re)articulated.
Ane Pilegaard Sørensen

Ane Pilegaard Sørensen

  • Ane Pilegaard Sørensen, Exhibition designer at Medical Museion
  • Personal link: more info
  • As an exhibition designer I’m interested in questions of how to communicate medical materialities through the spatiality of exhibition media. I’m currently working on an exhibition project at Medical Museion that poses a particular challenge in terms of material presence. In this exhibition we want to communicate the collection and use of human tissue in contemporary biomedicin. But actual human tissue samples from active biobanks are hard to come by and will typically be visible only through microscope or by the use of two-dimensional visualizations. I’m interested in exploring how the spatial qualities of exhibition media can be utilized in activating the limited and partly representational exhibition material available. Thereby giving the museum visitor an embodied sense of the three-dimensional materiality of biobanking.
Anja Johansen

Anja Johansen

  • Anja Johansen, PhD candidate at the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies of Culture, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
  • http://www.ntnu.edu - anja.johansen
  • http://insideoutimaging.wordpress.com/
  • The preliminary title of my PhD project is Between art and science: Renderings of the body in contemporary exhibitions. The aim is to explore images and imaginations of the body in contemporary exhibitions, with special attention to how the borders of art and science are negotiated. My research interests include art/science collaborations, the visual culture of medicine, cultures and politics of display, as well as theoretical discussions on affects, aesthetics and epistemology.As part of my research I’m interested in theories affect, which I find highly interesting but also somewhat problematic when it comes to analysis. Furthermore, as an academic, I’m most of the time involved in the practice of trying to communicate the materialities and experiences of exhibitions through text and various media (articles, ppt presentations, videos).
Angela Last

Angela Last

  • Dr Angela Last, MA Art & Science, Central Saint Martins
  • http://mutablematter.wordpress.com
  • Angela’s projects reflect her background in geography, art, design and science studies. Examples include Mutation, Animal Lab, Mutable Matter and, her most recent project, Sounding the Anthropocene. She works in a variety of media, from textiles to soundart, and has addressed topics such as genetic engineering, nanotechnology and the link between environmental issues and the human desire for perfection. In addition to creating ‘prototypes’, she publishes in academic and non-academic journals and on her blog, Mutable Matter. Being interested in the representation of materiality and its interplay with the political agency of different publics, she is keen to explore this connection in the context of medicine.'
Annamaria Carusi

Annamaria Carusi

  • Annamaria Carusi, Associate Professor, Centre for Medical Science and Technology
  • www.annamariacarusi.me
  • I study the way that computational technologies are involved in medical research, particularly: the social infrastructure for science in cyberinfrastructures, the construction of computational models and simulations of biological and physiological processes, and the role of computational displays and processing of images and other visualisations. I'm interested in the multiple ways that these supposedly abstract and disembodied computational networks, methods, tools and techniques are hooked up to material things.
Anthony Dunne

Anthony Dunne

  • Anthony Dunne, Professor and Head of Programme of Design Interactions at Royal College of Art, Partner at Dunne & Raby
  • Personal link 1: more info
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  • Twitter: @DI__RCA
  • Anthony Dunne is professor and head of the Design Interactions MA programme at the Royal College of Art in London. He is also a partner in the design studio Dunne & Raby (est. 1994). His projects with Fiona Raby use design as a medium to stimulate discussion and debate amongst designers, industry and the public about the social, cultural and ethical implications of emerging technologies. Their projects have been exhibited and published internationally and are in the permanent collections of MoMA (NYC), the Victoria & Albert Museum (London, UK), Frac Ile-de-France and Fnac (France). He is the author of Hertzian Tales (MIT Press, 2006) and co-author, with Fiona Raby, of Design Noir (2001). They have curated exhibitions for the Science Gallery in Dublin, The Wellcome Trust Windows in London, and the Beijing International Design Triennial at the National Museum of China. Anthony regularly contributes to design, technology and interaction design conferences as a keynote speaker.He studied Industrial Design (MDes) at the RCA before working at Sony Design in Tokyo. Anthony later completed a PhD in Computer Related Design at the RCA and was a founding member of the CRD Research Studio where he worked as a Senior Research Fellow leading EU and industry funded research projects. Anthony was awarded the Sir Misha Black Award for Innovation in Design Education in 2009.
Aud Sissel Hoel

Aud Sissel Hoel

  • Aud Sissel Hoel, Associate Professor of Visual Communication, Department of Art and Media Studies, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  • Personal link 1: more info
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  • My research interests revolve around science images and branch out to include photography, scientific instruments, technologies of thinking, medical imaging, and visualization. Currently I am heading an interdisciplinary research project on neuroimaging, and previously I conducted a project on photography used for identification and control.An overarching aim that cuts across my various projects is to develop what I have coined as a “differential” approach to images and mediating apparatuses more generally. This includes explorations of the inner connections between images and measurement and, crucially, of the material underpinnings of knowledge and communication. Through this work I have become increasingly interested in alternative, creative, and material communication practices. The neuroimaging project that I am currently involved in includes some attempts in that direction, such as for example the development of a brain anti-atlas.
Bente Vinge Pedersen

Bente Vinge Pedersen

  • Bente Vinge Pedersen, Senior Curator, Medical Museion
  • Personal link: more info
  • I am a museum practitioner, working as a senior curator at Medical Museion. I have an MA in History and Danish Literature and Language from Roskilde University. My main interest is exhibitions, but I also work with audiences, student guides, and event planning. Before coming to Medical Museion I worked at the Museum of Copenhagen, where I curated my first exhibition “The Drop of Water - Copenhagen in the time of Hans Christian Andersen” (2005). I have also worked with the history festival “Golden Days” here in Copenhagen. I came to Medical Museion in 2006 and was a part of the team behind “Oldetopia – an Exhibition on Age and Ageing” (2007). Most recently, I curated and produced the exhibition “Obesity – What’s the Problem?” (2012). Throughout my time at Medical Museion I have been involved in ongoing discussions about how to formulate science communication within the frame of a museum, alongside working with the practical challenges of making our exhibition house – the former Royal Academy of Surgeons – open to a wider public.
Chris Salter

Chris Salter

  • Chris Salter, Director, Hexagram Concordia Centre for Research-Creation in Media Art and Technology, Concordia University, Montreal. Associate Professor, Design and Computation Arts, Faculty of Fine Arts, Concordia University, Montreal. Director, LabXmodal
  • Personal link 1: more info
  • Personal link 2: more info
  • Research Overview
  • Lab xmodal is dedicated to a deeper exploration of the concept of interaction that goes beyond the traditional one-to-one relationship between user and computer and instead towards that of the embodied inhabitant in complex, dynamic environments. To accomplish this, xmodal focuses on interdisciplinary research-based practice involving theory/practice and collaborations from the visual and performing arts, design, engineering and computer science, computer music, anthropology, architecture, sociology, philosophy and techno-cultural studies. xmodal produces three outcomes from its research:
  • 1). Artistic performance/installation/research projects that tour internationally and explore the intertwining of human perception and technical systems.
  • 2). Scholarly work in the form of books, essays, conference presentations and technical proceedings.
  • 3). Development of hardware and software tools for sensing and dynamic control of media environments.
  • xmodal is funded by SSHRC, FQRSC, Hexagram, CINQ, CALQ, Canada Council for the Arts, Concordia University and other sources.
Claire Jones

Claire Jones

  • Dr Claire L. Jones, Director of the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Leeds
  • Personal link: more info
  • I am responsible for caring for and providing access to the University’s collection of historic medical instruments and pathological specimens and would like the chance to explore viable alternatives to verbal and written discourse surrounding object interpretation and communication.
David Pantalony

David Pantalony

  • David Pantalony, Canada Science and Technology Museum/University of Ottawa
  • Twitter: @SciTechCurator
  • At the Canada Science and Technology Museum, I am curator of Physical Sciences and Medicine, which also includes disciplines such as meteorology, computing, mathematics, metrology, astronomy, space and exploration. The themes and connections that emerge from collection-based research and teaching, however, are often independent of the subjects listed above. This presents a challenge that speaks to the title of this workshop, It's Not What You Think, and the pressing need to engage and share collections in new ways. For example, I admire the communal focus at Medical Museion on the immediate presence of artifacts beyond traditional intellectual/exhibition frameworks. At our annual Reading Artifacts workshop, which brings together people from across the country and disciplines, we use open-ended, collaborative artifact examinations to discover alternative narratives within collections. I am looking forward to learning from fellow participants their experience with these challenges and how they see it playing out in research, teaching and exhibits.
Emma Peterson

Emma Peterson

  • Emma Peterson, PhD student, Medical Museion
  • Personal link: more info
  • Twitter: @marchsmoothie
  • My PhD-project revolves around tactile aesthetics, museum objects and the sense of touch. I take departure from the basic research question: how museum visitors wish to touch museum objects and why? The aim of the project is to deepen the understanding of tactile aesthetics, its significance and boundaries in a museum setting through the study of the blind-historical collection at The State Institute for the Blind and the Weak-sighted in Copenhagen.The intention is to carry this out through close study of a selection of objects from the collection – where my own subjective sensory – impressions and experiences of the objects are central – combined with semi-structured interviews with visitors and museum staff. Due to the fact that materiality is at the core of my project I want to attend the workshop as to gain insight on how to communicate in text, but also in other ways, about objects and materiality.
Eric Jensen

Eric Jensen

Dr. Eric Jensen is a scholar of science communication, public engagement, STS, sociology and media with numerous peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Public Understanding of Science and Media, Culture & Society. I have also published papers on museum, zoo and festival visitor studies. My primary research interest overlaps with this workshop: how is expert knowledge (in this case medical knowledge) mediated for broader publics, and with what effect? Of course, mediation takes many different forms, including mass media, new media and material objects interpreted within museums for particular engagement or learning goals within museums. I have conducted numerous public engagement impact evaluations, as well as running a recently completed seminar series on public engagement impact evaluation click here for webpage
    My PhD is in Sociology from the University of Cambridge. My most recently published book is entitled: ‘Culture & Social Change: Transforming Society with the Power of Ideas’.
Federica Lucivero

Federica Lucivero

  • Dr. Federica Lucivero, Tilburg Institute for Law Technology and Society (TILT), University of Tilburg, The Netherlands
  • Personal link: more info
  • With my training in philosophy and STS, I am interested in the field of Technology Assessment, which is an early reflection about the social desirability of emerging (biomedical) technologies and their potential ethical implications. Emerging technologies are often presented by technology developers as instruments to reach a social goal and depicted as operating in a sterile place with an undefined user. Real contexts of applications prove to be much messier, dirtier, more material and unpredictable than the linearity of scientists’ expectations shows. To assess emerging technologies we need to thicken these expectations and situate them, exploring the materiality of the technology, the practice of use and the user’s morality. Then, for the goals of an early stage Technology Assessment, this analysis should be fed back to technology developers in order for them to take into account this bigger, messier, and material context in their decisions about this technology. In doing this, I don’t want to give them a report or present my findings. I want to see whether I can trigger their moral imagination, their capacity of “putting themselves in someone’s else shoes” and in this way affect their scientific practice and decisions. But how to this? How can we (philosophers, social scientists, ethicists) spur developers of medical technologies to develop such moral imagination that would allow them to feel the way the end-user (the patient) is going to feel? How can such an imaginative exercise be brought in their scientific practice? Is a discussion of scenarios enough? What alternative tools could be developed?
Fionagh Thomson

Fionagh Thomson

  • Dr Fionagh Thomson, Senior Researcher, Culture Lab, Newcastle University, UK
  • Personal link: more info
  • I am a methodologist with an interest in how to create the space and time with participants to think through and describe their everyday lives: focusing on what people do rather than what they think they do. I work with video, camera, paper and conversation. Current research interests include: different representations of the ‘body’ in medical spaces, the extension of our senses through technologies in meaning-making, hermeneutics (Ricoeur & Ihde) and the challenges of accessing everyday embodied experiences not easily represented through pen or voice.  My background includes educational philosophy, human geography and visual anthropology.  Fieldwork locations include the rainforests of Papua New Guinea, the islands of the Scottish Hebrides and the consulting spaces of English NHS hospitals.  Based at Culture Lab at Newcastle University, I currently work on the  ‘Ageing Creatively’ pilot project (Medical Council). This study explores the relationship between creative arts and wellbeing in later life from participants’ perspectives. Previous research projects include: the role of IT within health professional-patient interactions during the consultation, and the social and ethical implications of a European Nanomedicine (lab-on-a-chip) project.
Frederik Petersen

Frederik Petersen

  • Frederik Petersen, cand. arch., PhD
  • Personal link: more info
  • 1. Working in the gap between representation and realisation inarchitecture through the split between documentation and fabricationin photography, I explore ideas connected to bodily intimacy andtactility in architectural drawing. I've staged and investigated this in a number of voluptuous picture planes. This have lead me to work with stereography in order to reassociate the curved picture plane drawings with a new sense of depth. I'm fascinated with the nature of the spatial representation and the tactile sensation of depth we experience when viewing photographic stereo pairs – the cut-out card board effect that resembles our experience of visual depth and is unlike it.
  • 2. I'm fascinated with the representation of reality in collections ofnatural history and religious exhibitions. Particularly the mixture of real and fabricated model parts in the natural history habitat diorama and the seam between two- and three-dimensional spatial representation. This seam may appear clearly defined – as a tangible spatial border – or may be detected in small inconsistencies that confuse the inner and outer reality of the exhibition plateau.
Jacob Knudsen

Jacob Knudsen

  • Jacob Knudsen, Projectdeveloper and Dramaturg, VIFIN (Resource Center for Integration, Municipality of Vejle)
  • Personal link 1: more info
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  • At an overall level, I do digital media based Concept development, quite often using inspiration from theatre and art. I praxis, I work with a variety of projects in the field of Digital storytelling and Educational programs, Augmented Reality, Exhibitions, Events and activities, Theatre plays, Websites, etc. Some of it, as part of my work at VIFIN. Some of it as experimental work on my own or in collaboration with others.Apart from that, I have a past as Museum Curator at Vejle Museum and are still active in various museum related projects.   At a professional level my interest in participating in the ‘It’s Not What You Think’ workshop is mainly an interest in the interplay between physical and mediated spaces and materialities. A field I have been exploring together with Kjetil Sandvik on several occasions. At a personal level I have an interest in medical history, among others from my time at university.
Jane Macnaughton

Jane Macnaughton

  • Jane Macnaughton, Professor of Medical Humanities, Durham University, Co-director of Durham's Centre for Medical Humanities
  • Personal link 1: more info
  • Personal link 2: more info
  • I am medical humanities scholar and also a clinician working in cervical screening.  My work in medical humanities has focused largely on the psychological interplay between physician and patient in the consultation, and on the potential – or lack of potential – for empathetic response in those contexts.  I became interested in the work of Martin Buber on intersubjectivity and how this relates to what I regard as the oscillation of objective and subjective perspectives by both clinician and patient in the clinic.  This thinking has been stimulated more recently when I changed my clinical work from general practice to colposcopy, which is the examination carried out on women who have abnormal cervical smears.  I became interested in observing my own embodied development as a clinician as I started to become accustomed to the examination and biopsy tools I was learning to use.  I realised that with increasing expertise, I became less aware of a tool as a tool, but more as an extension of my examining hand, and the idea of ‘feeling’ the tissue touched by the instrument began to have meaning.  This experience has led me to think more about the embodied nature of the clinician and the part this plays in humane clinical practice.  The idea of a workshop dealing with the ‘things’ of medicine, therefore, really caught my eye and stimulated my interest and I am looking forward to packing up my biopsy forceps and coming to Copenhagen!
Jenell Johnson

Jenell Johnson

  • Jenell Johnson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Communication Arts, Director, Disability Studies Initiative Affiliate, Holtz Center for Science & Technology Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • http://www.jenelljohnson.com
  • Most of my work concerns issues of epistemology and expertise in non-expert discourse about psychiatry and neuroscience. The Neuroscientific Turn: Transdisciplinarity in the Age of the Brain (U Michigan Press, 2012) is a collection of essays from neuroscientists, humanists, and social scientists reflecting on the promise and pitfalls of new “neuro” disciplines. American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History (U Michigan Press, 2014) explores how representations of psychosurgery in American popular culture contributed to its development and decline in American medicine. I am deeply interested in how rhetorical and cultural theory helps us to re-envision "health" and "communication" and how these new visions trouble the relationship between expert knowledges and non-expert practices. This workshop offers an opportunity to stir together theories of materiality and embodiment with objects and bodies and the chance to apply the admixture to the too-often disembodied, immaterial practice of health communication.
Johanna Pingel

Johanna Pingel

  • Johanna Pingel, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland FHNW, the "Institut Integrative Gestaltung (Masterstudio Design)"
  • Personal link 1: more info
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  • The aim of my project is to translate the outcome of current medical research in the field of Mind Body* Medicine into systems and objects that people can a) rationally understand and b) intuitively use or be part of. In this way design is used to help and empower people to create significant adjustments and improvements in their mind sets and in their lives.In my recent master project I take a look at art installations.I question if they do have the potential of being used in the context of healing stress induced- and psychosomatic diseases. This research on art installations is the basis for my following work: the design of objects and spaces of healing.   My main interest in visiting this workshop is to get to know other perspectives on medical materials and their communicaton. What do other workshops participants t hink about possible contributions of design - based knowing, thinking, researching and doing in this field?
Johanna Willenfelt

Johanna Willenfelt

  • Johanna Willenfelt, Artist and teaching assistant at Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg.
  • http://johannawillenfelt.blogspot.se/
  • I am a visual artist currently based in Gothenburg, Sweden. For several years I have investigated, through research-based practice, the phenomenon of physical pain and the production of extra-linguistic, tacit, bodily knowledge. My methodologies are normally associated with fine arts practice, but my approach is interdisciplinary, informed by procedures from other fields of study. In addition, I am influenced by the context of medical history, pain cultures and illness narratives. Predominantly text-based, my work is often presented as composite installations in which relational aspects of pain and suffering are negotiated. Besides textual elements, my installations comprise media such as drawing and painting, sonic and medical objects. Recent interests in the socio-materiality of “sharing pain” (patient – caretaker, art work – audience) have led to my participation in the It´s Not What You Think: Communicating Medical Materialities workshop at the Medical Museion.
John Wynne

John Wynne

  • Dr John Wynne, Reader in Sound Arts, University of the Arts London
  • Personal link: more info
  • My work as an artist and researcher is divided between site-specific sound installation, primarily from a sensory and phenomenological perspective, and more 'socially engaged' practice, also focused on sound.  Photographer Tim Wainwright and I were artists in residence for one year at Harefield Hospital, one of the world’s leading centres for heart and lung transplantation.  We recorded and photographed patients, the devices they were attached to or had implanted, and the hospital environment, researching and developing ideas leading to a 24-channel sound/photography installation, a book of essays and interviews, a DVD and a half-hour 'composed documentary' for BBC Radio.  Our observations and interviews on the transplant ward confirm anthropologist Tom Rice’s assertion that in hospitals sound takes on “a more affective quality because of the drought in other sensory modalities.”  For patients, hearing becomes arguably the most vital sense for understanding the environment and making sense of one’s experience.
  • I want to take part in this workshop to explore new ideas alongside practitioners and theoreticians from a variety of fields.  Although my starting point is always sound, my research and creative practice has always crossed disciplinary boundaries, both in terms of media and disciplines.
Karin Tybjerg

Karin Tybjerg

  • Karin Tybjerg, Associate professor at Medical Museion
  • Personal link: more info
  • I am associate professor at Medical Museion – a position that combines research, curating and teaching. My research projects are mainly concerned with the interface between physics and medical science and I am developing projects on medical imaging and on automation. I am moreover interested in the connections between museums, philosophy of science and science communication – between matter, spirit and science. In my curatorial practices I attempt to navigate the the Scylla of the Science Centre and the Charybdis of the Cabinet. To include the specificity and tactile attractiveness of material objects with a pennant for conceptual thinking and a love of science. I am also responsible for the philosophy of science part of the course in medical engineering (shared between Copenhagen University and the Danish Technical University).
Kirsty Stansfield

Kirsty Stansfield

  • Kirsty Stansfield
  • Personal link: more info
  • My artistic practice is research driven and process-led. This emphasis on process is integral to creating discrete art works using a variety of media including video, sound, sculpture, installation, and interactive technologies, but extends to exploring how an audience engages with the situations I orchestrate. Recent  works have been developed in situations of health care where I have worked with elderly women living in a continuing care ward and a choreographer; actors and a choreographer in a Communication Suite at The Medical School, Glasgow University exploring non-verbal communication to enact authentic experience; and parents and medical staff in a Neonatal Unit working collaboratively with artist Steven Anderson to explore the everyday performative practices and specific materialities of the institutional environment. I am particularly interested in exploring the "voice as object", the voice conceived as being an object, a physical entity with material presence, of equal significance to all other objects.
Kjetil Sandvik

Kjetil Sandvik

  • Kjetil Sandvik, MA, PHD, Associate Professor, Department for Media, Cognition and Communication, University of Copenhagen 
  • Website: link 1
  • Research group: Digital Communication and Aesthetics: link 2
  • Research project: Meaning Across Media: cross media communication and co-creation: link 3
  • Research project: Sharing Death. Media, Materiality and Ritualization, associated to Danish Council for Independent Research-project Death, Materiality and the Origin of Time: link 4
  • Research focus on strategic cross media communication, new media and storytelling related to organization and network communication, political and public communication, marketing, journalism, science and cultural communication. Since my PHD project I have been working with the aesthetics and dramaturgy of computer games and other types of interactive fiction forms and their roleplay-oriented user modes characterized by participation and co-creation and their aesthetical and educational potentials. In recent years this research field has been expanded into various projects concerning participation-centered exhibition practices with focus on augmented and mixed realities and the interplay between physical and mediated spaces and materialities, which is why the ‘It’s Not What You Think’ workshop is of specific interest.
Louise Whiteley

Louise Whiteley

  • Louise Whiteley, Assistant Professor in Medical Science Communication, NNF CBMR and Medical Museion, University of Copenhagen
  • http://www.museion.ku.dk/about-museion/staff/louise-whiteley/
  • Twitter: @lewhiteley
  • The thread running through my academic journey from psychology, philosophy, and theoretical neuroscience to science communication, media studies, and empirical bioethics, is a fascination withwhat happens when human experience meets its scientific description in popular culture, and the negotiations, appropriations, resistances, and play that occur. My current focus is how recent expansions of the neurosciences into traditional territories of humanistic and sociological enquiry troubleassumptions about which disciplines and expertscan arbitrate on matters of the (embodied) mind- from mental illness to experiences of hunger - and in the importance placed on the role of the media in discussion about ethical and social implications. I also try to put my academic interests into dialogue with science communication practice, and alongside writing and reviewing, have worked on a multimedia theater production (interiortraces.com), and in the last year have developed an event series at Medical Museion aiming to foreground medical objects and research processes.In both analyzing and practicing public engagement, I am driven by an interest in process. One of the key challenges for transforming top-down, linear science communication into reciprocal, malleable, and creative engagements with what science is, does, means, and might be, is representingthe processes of science – but also the processes by which ‘public’ encounters with science contribute to negotiations over its meaning. This poses several challenges relating to the theme of the workshop, for instance, how materialities that are subjectively experienced and evolve over time can be exhibited or otherwise shared, and how one can bring to light often-neglected material and affective dimensions without in turn neglecting the animating possibilities of language. In co-organizing this workshop, I was interested to meet others wrestling with related issues, to explore different formats for communicating about them,and to join in broader discussions about how various ‘turns’ to materiality in studies of science can steer a course betwixt bewitchment and anachronism, and new ways of sensing and understanding.
Lucy Lyons

Lucy Lyons

  • Dr. Lucy Lyons, Lecturer in drawing research and painting, City & Guilds of London Art School
  • http://www.lucylyons.org/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/lucylyons/
  • I am a London based visual artist, researcher and lecturer in drawing research and painting at City & Guilds of London Art School. My interdisciplinary research examines the role of drawing as a participatory method for gaining and communicating insights into the unfamiliar, horrific or shocking. I also investigate its use as a valuable method for re-seeing and revealing nuances about overly familiar and undervalued phenomena. Drawing is used to present sensuous experiences of material objects and encounters within medical science.I worked with the Royal College of Surgeons of England and Naturhistorisches Museum Basel throughout my PhD, Delineating Disease: a system for investigating Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva at  My drawings revealed new information and clearer insights into this rare disease. From 2009-2011 I was Postdoctoral Fellow at Medical Museion, University of Copenhagen. My research examined how drawing could reveal the breadth of the everyday overlooked experiences of ageing.
Ludwig Zeller

Ludwig Zeller

  • Ludwig Zeller, Lecturer in Interaction Design at the Visual Communication Institute, Academy of Art and Design Basel
  • http://www.ludwigzeller.de
  • Personal link 2: more info
  • Having a background in audio-visual media arts my studies at the Royal College of Arts in London opened up the world of Speculative Design to me. There I learnt that design is not necessarily about the optimisation of products but can be used as a tool to visualise possible worlds and make people understand and feel possible implications of new technologies and societal changes.
  • Currently I am setting up a new research project at the Academy of Art and Design in Basel that continues these interests. This new project seeks out to establish a network for experimental and innovative ways of science communication between swiss and international partners.
  • We want to develop a service structure that makes our approach visible and accessible as a tool and framework to partners from science and industry.
Maja Horst

Maja Horst

  • Maja Horst, Head of Department of Media, Cognition and Communication, UCPH
  • http://mcc.ku.dk/staff/?id=139745&vis=medarbejder
  • www.stamcellenetvaerket.dk
  • Maja Horst is Head of Department of Media, Cognition and Communication in University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Before taking up this position in 2011, she was associate professor in Science and Technology Studies at Copenhagen Business School. Maja Horst has been engaged in a number of research projects on public understanding of science funded by the Danish research councils and in international collaborative research networks on dialogical science communication funded by EU and Nordforsk (Scandinavian research council). She has also been experimenting with dialogical communication of her own research in two spatial installations created in collaboration with designers and artists. Her latests publications on these installations has focused on the tensions between dissemination and dialogue, the material aspects and 'personal component' of science communication as well as the ethics of science communication. These aspects are also the basis of her interest in the workshop.
Oron Catts

Oron Catts

  • Oron Catts, Director, SymbioticA, The Centre of Excellence in Biological Arts, School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia, Visiting Professor, Aalto University, BiofiliA -Base for Biological Arts, School of Art Design and Architecture
  • Personal link 1: more info
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  • I am exploring the shifting relations and perceptions of life in the light of new knowledge and the ways this knowledge is being applied; when life becomes a raw material used for human centric ends. I am interested in the manipulated life as a thing, in particular when it leaves the confines of biomedical and agricultural and enters the cultural realm. Focusing mainly on regenerative biology and lately on synthetic biology I developed artistic projects that make strange the materiality of living things. In 1996 I started with Ionat Zurr The Tissue Culture & Art Project. In 2000 I co-founded SymbioticA, an artistic research lab (now centre) at The University of Western Australia. SymbioticA’s research is broader in scope and looks at the impact of much of the sciences and technologies (in particular the biological) on life in general and on our culture and society.
Phil Loring

Phil Loring

  • Phil Loring, BPS Curator of Psychology, Science Museum, London
  • Personal link: more info
  • I'm a historian of psychology and psychiatry, and since 2009 I have been the Curator of Psychology at the Science Museum in London, a post part-funded by the British Psychological Society. My responsibilities include acquisitions, collections management, research, public events, and exhibition development. I'm currently curating an exhibition on the history and science of nerves, to open in December 2013, and helping lead the major redevelopment of the Museum's permanent medical galleries, to open in 2018-19. We're completely re-deploying our extraordinarily diverse medical collections around seven life stages, from cradle to grave. Visitors often come to the Science Museum expecting to find trains and missiles, not lancets and memento mori, so I'm eager to find ways to draw on surprise, fear, and disgust in order to make the new galleries both provocative and generative for audiences of all ages.
Rachael Kendrick

Rachael Kendrick

  • Rachael Kendrick
Sam Alberti

Sam Alberti

  • Sam Alberti, Director of Museums and Archives at the Royal College of Surgeons of England (including the Hunterian Museum), Visiting Senior Research Fellow in History at King’s College London
  • Personal link: more info
  • I am interested in the past, present and future of medical and natural history collections. I have published on medical museums, on the Manchester Museum, and on dead animals; and co-curated exhibitions on race, museum history, sport anatomy, and military surgery. This year I’ve been concentrating on the bicentenary of the Hunterian Museum. At the workshop I hope we’ll be able to unpack the materiality of human remains in collections, and their potential for exploring the construction of the (ab)normal. I wonder how we’ll connect these objects-that-were-once-people with the instruments in our museums to explore the lived experience of disease and difference.
Sandra Dudley

Sandra Dudley

  • Dr Sandra H. Dudley, School of Museum Studies, University of Leicester.
  • Personal link: more info
  • I am a social anthropologist who focuses on material and visual cultures (especially in exile and in museums, and with particular interests in dress, textiles and art). I am especially interested in alternative ways to investigate and theorise the fundamentally material relationships between people and things, and it is particularly for this reason that I am pleased to be able to attend the ‘It’s Not What You Think’ workshop. My current work explores the physicality of, amongst other matters, displacements, aesthetics and notions of ‘well-being’. It is influenced by a range of perspectives, including theories of ritual and fetishism, postcolonialism, phenomenology, and eighteenth and early nineteenth century poetry. I have worked extensively across disciplines, including in sustained collaboration with a neuroscientist. Books include Materialising Exile (Berghahn 2010) and Displaced Things (Routledge forthcoming), and a number of edited volumes, including Museum Materialities (2010) and Museum Objects (2012).
Sarah Davies

Sarah Davies

  • Dr Sarah R. Davies
  • http://sciencemuseumdiscovery.com/...
  • http://scholar.google.dk/citations
  • I am a researcher in the University of Copenhagen's Department of Media, Cognition and Communication. My PhD (2007) was carried out in Imperial College London’s Science Communication Group; since then, I've worked at Durham University, UK, as a Public Engagement Fellow at the UK’s Beacon North East, and at Arizona State University’s Center for Nanotechnology in Society. My research focuses on the relationship between science and society, and has been published in journals such as Science Communication, Science as Culture, and Public Understanding of Science. My current work explores a number of themes, including materiality and affect in deliberative processes, the governance of emerging technologies, and hopefulness and interest in scientific talk. I'm interested in the materiality of science communication, and in what it means to analyse public engagement as a set of embodied, situated and affective encounters - and hence in this workshop!
Sebastian Mohr

Sebastian Mohr

  • Sebastian Mohr, cultural anthropologist and PhD student at Centre for Medical Science and Technology Studies, University of Copenhagen
  • Personal link: more info
  • My research project engages with practices at the laboratories of sperm banks as well as with sperm donors’ experiences of being a donor. A big part of my empirical work touches upon sperm as a material that people work with at the sperm bank but also a materiality sperm donors encounter as part of being a donor. When talking about my research I like to think of and refer to it as engaging with the mattering of sperm. Yet, when presenting my research I am almost always limited to representations of sperm and its mattering as captured in fieldwork journals, photos, drawings, interview transcripts or videos. How to overcome these limitations? What to do with mattering that involves taboos, desires, disgust, and pleasure? How can I approach this kind of mattering and engage a larger public with mattering?
Sofie Lebech

Sofie Lebech

  • Sofie Lebech, Performance artist
  • www.sofievolquartzlebech.dk
  • I am a performance artist working solo and in collaborations. In 2006 I finished a MA in Comparative Literature and Modern Culture from The University of Copenhagen. In my current artistic research, I focus on knowledge based performance and interdisciplinary knowledge creation. The aim is to examine how art and research can create new spaces for thinking, when they are mixed together.I would like to participate in It’s Not What You Think, because the workshop offers a unique insight into a research practice which is new to me but which I will engage with in the development of the lecture performance Terror as an Autoimmune Disease (working title). The lecture performance explores the theme of terror both as a political factor in the world surrounding us and as a personal experience of what happens with the human body when it gets an autoimmune disease.
Steven Anderson

Steven Anderson

  • Steven Anderson
  • www.stevenanderson.info
  • My work surrounds an idea of institutional systems of social and behavioural constructs. Using performance I direct actions, which implicate every audience member in the live making of the work in order to explore ritual and relic qualities of the everyday. Centered around a live, emotionally invested, unaccompanied voice, past performances have used possessions of audience and shared actions to create reflective and socialising tools. Informed by oral culture and elementary theatre practice, each performance constructs a complete environment that resists logical interpretation to become a temporal and de-material shared experience. In collaboration, Kirsty Stansfield and I explored how the institutional hierarchies of a Neonatal Unit influenced people to adapt their behaviour to expected norms. Having developed a critical framework for investigating the unit and the relationships within this as a metaphorical stage, we want to explore how the specific materialities of the unit can be communicated out with the original context.
Thomas Söderqvist

Thomas Söderqvist

  • Thomas Söderqvist, professor, director of Medical Museion, University of Copenhagen
  • http://www.museion.ku.dk/about-museion/staff/thomas-soderqvist
  • One of my basic interests is how scientific knowledge can be used both to achieve cultural hegemony (knowledge-power), on the one hand, and to empower individual human beings, on the other. (In a biomedical context this contradiction is often translated as a conflict between ‘biopower’ and ‘biopolitical resistance’.) Educational and cultural institutions as well as media can work both ways, and museums (including science museums) – being both educational institutions, cultural instititions and media institutions – are no exception. As institutions for ‘public understanding of science’ and ‘public engagement with science’ they can develop strategies both for cultural hegemony and for empowerment. Much work in social studies of science and history of science has been devoted to analyzing cultural hegemony, but much less interest has been paid to individual empowerment. Earlier I have explored the genre of scientific biography and autobiography as media for individual empowerment, but in recent years I have also become interested in social media and citizen science as genres and technologies for empowerment. Currently I’m applying the same kind of thinking to the aesthetic dimension of science; I’m not thinking of high sci-art, but rather the everyday aesthetics of science, which includes the use of other senses than vision (which is perhaps more associated with hegemony), i.e., touch, smell and taste. My hypothesis is that the engagement with material objects through other senses than vision sustain empowerment, because it makes us aware of aspects of the world that cannot easily be subjected by discursive power.