Wade Rousch’s article ‘Social machines’ in the last issue of MIT’s Technology Review is a good summary of the social networking possibilities provided by ‘continuous computing’ (The blogversion of the article is easier to read than the MIT/TR-version.) It’s worth reading in itself, but it raises more problems than it answers. For example, is ‘continuous computing’ primarily a set of technologies and social practices that feed into the leisure economy (‘finding a good restaurant near your mobile phone’)? Or can you imagine it having decisive effects on more substantial life-areas like biomedical research, biotech industry, medical care and health services (‘finding a heart surgeon close to your portable’) too?

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