The Historiography of Contemporary Science, Technology and Medicine: Writing Recent Science, edited by Ron Doel and myself has now been published by Routledge; see Amazon’s website and Routledge’s website. We are also setting up a special website for the book, which will hopefully be operating in a few weeks.
See contents here:

Contents

1 Ronald E. Doel og Thomas Söderqvist: “Introduction: what we know, what we do not—and why it matters”

2 Keay Davidson: “Why science writers should forget Carl Sagan and read Thomas Kuhn: on the troubled conscience of a journalist”

3 Bruce V. Lewenstein: “The history of now: reflections on being a
‘contemporary archivist’”

4 David Cantor: “The politics of commissioned histories (revisited)”

5 Anne Fitzpatrick: “From behind the fence: threading the labyrinths of classified historical research”

6 Lene Koch: “On ethics, scientists, and democracy: writing the history of eugenic sterilization”

7 Thomas Söderqvist: “What is the use of writing lives of recent scientists?”

8 Alfred I. Tauber: “Scholarship as self-knowledge: a case study”

9 John Krige: “The politics of phosphorus-32: a Cold War fable based on fact”

10 Michael Aaron Dennis: “Secrecy and science revisited: from politics to historical practice and back”

11 Lillian Hoddeson: “The conflict of memories and documents: dilemmas and pragmatics of oral history”

12 Ronald E. Doel og Pamela M. Henson: “Reading photographs: photographs as evidence in writing the history of modern science”

13 Alexis de Greiff og Mauricio Nieto Olarte: “What we still do not know about South–North technoscientific exchange: North-centrism, scientific diffusion, and the social studies of science”

14 E. M. Tansey: “Witnessing the witnesses: potentials and pitfalls of the witness seminar in the history of twentieth-century medicine”

15 Arne Hessenbruch: “‘The mutt historian’: the perils and opportunities of doing history of science on-line”

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